5 Expectations Parents Of Atypical Learners Need To Let Go Of

Sometimes the hardest part can be letting go of our own expectations. The reality is, it can be one of the very best things you can do for your atypical child. These are 5 areas of our lives that we need to adjust or let go of entirely, in order to thrive. 

 
 

5 Expectations Parents Of Atypical Learners Need To Let Go Of

If there’s one thing I’ve learned as a parent to four atypical kids, it’s that have to do what you have to do with your child. It may not look the same as another family, and that’s OK! You letting go of expectations just might be the very best thing you can do for your homeschool, your child, and your own sanity!

These 5 aspects of parenting are where we typically need to let go.

Educational Expectations

If you have homeschooled your child for any length of time, this one likely doesn’t surprise you. When our atypical children progress on their own timelines and learn in atypical ways, it becomes essential to let go of any formal educational expectations we may have had for children.

The good news is, once we let go, our children are free to learn in the ways that work best for their unique needs. 

Social Expectations

Neurotypical kiddos have a way of upending our social expectations as well. Friendships often look much different for our children than we imagined. In fact, many atypical kids find peers that are much younger or much older to be better fits. For one of my children, one of the best social relationships was an older mentor-type figure.

Letting go of preconceived notions of what a social life entails for our children takes the pressure off of us and allows our kids to thrive in relationships that make sense for their needs.

 

5 Expectations Parents Of Atypical Learners Need To Let Go Of

 

Parenting Expectations

You may let things slide that other parents would never. Let me say it again. You may find that you allow more screen time, books to be read, language that you never imagined being a part of your dinner conversation, and so many more parenting expectations completely upended. 

I am here to encourage you to do just that. Let go of the guilt or fear that comes from comparing ourselves to other parents, and instead create boundaries and rules in your family that make sense for your particular children.

Nutritional Expectations

Restricted or obsessive eating is often a part of the puzzle that we are putting together in an effort to support our children. This means that nutritional expectations might look completely different for your family. 

My friend Shawna used to allow her son, who had extremely restricted eating due to sensory issues, have ice cream in the morning before school. It gave him a little bit of protein, calmed down the flight or fight he experienced each meal time, and made the day progress more smoothly. On more than one occasion, she was accused of spoiling him. He turned out just fine – healthy and eventually, able to handle a more traditional breakfast. She has no regrets.

Personal Expectations

This one can be the most difficult of all. The truth is, many of our children simply require more care. This means less time for our own pursuits and relaxation.

I want to encourage you to do what you can, when you can, and remember that you are a person too! Your health and care matters just as much as your child’s. After all, you are their mother. They need you to be healthy and happy.

 

5 Expectations Parents Of Atypical Learners Need To Let Go Of

 

Strategies To Help Your Child Thrive

This is part of our series, 10 Strategies to Help Your Atypical Children Thrive. 

Download your free parent guide below. 

Click here to subscribe 

 

The Raising Lifelong Learners Podcast Episode #162: 5 Expectations Parents Of Atypical Learners Need To Let Go Of

Sometimes the hardest part can be letting go of our own expectations. The reality is, it can be one of the very best things you can do for your atypical child. These are 5 areas of our lives that we need to adjust or let go of entirely, in order to thrive. 

 

Links And Resources From Today’s Show:

 

Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnoses of Gifted Children and Adults: ADHD, Bipolar, OCD, Asperger's, Depression, and Other Disorders (2nd edition)Raising Gifted Children: A Practical Guide for Parents Facing Big Emotions and Big PotentialDifferently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional WorldTo Be Gifted and Learning Disabled: Strength-Based Strategies for Helping Twice-Exceptional Students With LD, ADHD, ASD, and MoreGifted People: Being Aware of Gifted Children and AdultsRaising Creative Kids: A Collection of Simple Creativity Prompts for ChildrenSuccess Strategies for Parenting Gifted Kids: Expert Advice From the National Association for Gifted ChildrenUnderstanding Your Gifted Child From the Inside Out: A Guide to the Social and Emotional Lives of Gifted KidsWhy I Love Homeschooling Neurodiverse Kids: 25 Parents Share the Joys & Challenges of Educating Their Kids Who Have ADHD, Autism, Dyslexia, Giftedness, or Are Otherwise Differently WiredThe Big Book of Kids Activities: 500 Projects That Are the Bestest, Funnest EverRaising Resilient Sons: A Boy Mom's Guide to Building a Strong, Confident, and Emotionally Intelligent Family100 Backyard Activities That Are the Dirtiest, Coolest, Creepy-Crawliest Ever!: Become an Expert on Bugs, Beetles, Worms, Frogs, Snakes, Birds, Plants and More

 

 
 
 

Leave a Rating or Review

Doing so helps me get the word out about the podcast. iTunes bases their search results on positive ratings, so it really does help — and it’s easy!

    • Click THIS link to go to the podcast main page.
    • Click on View in iTunes under the podcast cover artwork.
    • Once your iTunes has launched and you are on the podcast page, click on Ratings and Review under the podcast name. There you can leave either or both! Thanks so much.

 

Want to record your own question, comment, or have your kids tell us what they LOVE to learn about? Click below and start recording!

 

 

Previous

Next