It started out an easy, relaxed conversation, and then the mom at the library asked me the question I most dread answering… “What curriculum do you use with your kids?”

I always stammer and then feel like a deer caught in the headlights. I mean, how can I possibly even answer that semmingly simple question? You, dear reader, can pop a search into the sidebar and find posts of curriculum past, but I’d have to warn you that those plans almost always changed right after posting them… we just don’t stand still around here, and we loathe ruts.

We’re eclectic.

101 Reasons Eclectic Homeschooling Works for Gifted Kids

 

We pick and choose from a bunch of different approaches to learning, curriculums, and styles — and we are very often following a child’s lead, diving down rabbit holes, and even leaning into more unschooling than schooling.

It suits us — a family with several gifted and twice-exceptional kiddos. Maybe it would suit you too?

I’ve compiled a bunch of reasons that an eclectic approach to homeschooling is right for gifted kiddos. What would you add?

101 Reasons Eclectic Homeschooling Works for Gifted Kids

  1. Eclectic Homeschooling allows you to incorporate your favorite aspects of other methods.
  2. You can settle into an ease of mind and enjoy homeschooling again once you let go of overly rigid programs and curriculums.
  3. Your children can explore their own passions freely.
  4. Eclectic homeschooling allows for gifted kiddos to embrace unschooling in their strongest areas.
  5. Delight directed learning is a natural way for kids to learn.
  6. When homeschooling eclectically, you can incorporate any curriculum you want to without worrying if it fits into a specific method.
  7. You can incorporate STEM into just about any lesson easily.
  8. Notebooking is a natural fit for documenting and letting kids take ownership of their own work when using the eclectic method. 
  9. Got voracious readers? It’s easy to “count” that independent learning as school when you let go and let the child lead.
  10. When you’re eclectic in your homeschool, it’s easy to incorporate unit studies and let the kids explore the rabbit trail-y topics they find interesting.
  11. You can easily design lessons to fit the individual needs of each of your kids with eclectic homeschooling.
  12. Learning happens in a more organic, relaxed way when you’re eclectic.
  13. There’s a lot of flexibility so you can adapt when your children have a variety of interests and activities outside the home making for crazy schedules.
  14. It’s a great method to use to teach kids of varying ages, skill levels, and passions.
  15. You can spend as much time as needed to fully research and understand a topic or concept.
  16. With eclectic homeschooling you aren’t held to specific time frames like 36- or 48- week periods so you can school year-round.
  17. It’s a great way to be purposeful and organized about the educational goals you set for your individual kiddos.
  18. Relaxing the choices and adapting to individual needs can make for a more peaceful home. 
  19. Being eclectic means you can pivot easily to meet the specific needs of your gifted or twice-exceptional kiddos. 
  20. Eclectic homeschooling allows for kids to learn through their own unique learning styles.
  21. The eclectic method of homeschooling allows families to create an atmosphere of learning that is all their own.
  22. Being eclectic means you can pick and choose from a bunch of different methods and curriculums to meet your kids where they are in each different subject.
  23. Passion-driven learning is lifelong learning.
  24. Your entire home becomes a learning environment when you homeschool in an interest-driven, eclectic way because you tend to start strewing things for your kids to find.
  25. Eclectic homeschoolers see learning opportunities all around them.
  26. It’s easy to teach kids of different ages and abilities with eclectic homeschooling as you’re already picking from various sources, you can adapt to different levels as well.
  27. You can tweak curriculum as you go to adapt to the ever-changing needs of your gifted kiddo.
  28. Anything can be a learning resource when you think eclectically.
  29. Eclectic homeschooling makes it easy to take time off whenever you need to.
  30. You can efortlessly foster that lifelong love of learning in your kids by encouraging them to explore their interests anytime during the day.
  31. Learning can happen anywhere when you’re an eclectic homeschooler.
  32. Eclectic learning might be right for you if you love to mix and match your curriculum.
  33. Gifted kiddos are asynchronous and don’t fit those boxed curriculums anyway.
  34. It’s a cinch to fill gaps when you find them when you’re not tied to a single curriculum.
  35. Eclectic homeschoolers can fill their days with the beautiful — books and nature
  36. Save money by not buying a boxed curriculum and focus on picking and choosing to suit your kiddos’ needs and interests.
  37. Eclectic homeschooling provides a perfectly custom education for your child. 
  38. Eclectic homeschoolers learn right alonside their kids.
  39. Incorporating lots of experiments is super easy with eclectic homeschooling.
  40. There’s more time for art and music.
  41. Eclectic homeschooling looks different for every family, so there’s no pressure to be anyone but yourself. 
  42. If you find yourself leaning towards several different methods of homeschooling, then you’re already an eclectic homeschooler… Embrace the adventure.
  43. Gifted kids get the freedom to pursue the things they love in an eclectic homeschool. 
  44. It never gets boring in an eclectic homeschooling home — there’s always something new to try.
  45. Gifted kids learn differently than their neurotypical peers, and eclectic homeschooling allows them to be themselves.
  46. Being eclectic means it’s easy to meet each individual kiddo where they are and allow them to learn new things every single day.
  47. Oftentimes families discover that what they thought would work well in the fall, is not a great fit by spring. Eclectic moms know it’s okay to switch things up mid-year.
  48. Being eclectic makes it easy to adapt to both strengths AND weaknesses.
  49. Rather than feeling frustrated that one curriculum can’t do it all for a kiddo, eclectic homeschoolers enjoy the journey of finding exactly the right materials for each varied subject.
  50. Learning through a variety of materials and methods means that the days never get boring. 
  51. Eclectic homeschooling doesn’t mean being random, it means being thoughtfully deliberate about what you want for your child then preparing a variety of materials to meet those needs.
  52. Eclectic homeschoolers have the freedom to choose co-ops and outside classes based on their kids’ interests instead of a specific curricular bent. 
  53. Eclectic homeschooling can be a lot more frugal than other methods. The library is a family’s best friend.
  54. When you’re an eclectic homeschooler it’s easy to tap into your kiddos’ unique learning styles and match their curriculums up with how they learn best.
  55. Interest led homeschooling with an eclectic bent means you can take time to listen to your kids and find out what’s already sparking their interests — and runnning with it. 
  56. It’s super easy to target specifc areas needed. For example, we don’t teach language arts once our kids learn to read, but when my oldest needed help with grammar, we were able to pull in a workbook program that targeted the skills he needed to work on
  57. It’s easy to incorporate audio books from resources like Audible to let your child listen to learn.
  58. You can cover only the topics you feel are most important for your child to learn.
  59. Eclectic homeschoolers have an easier time accelerating as they’re not tied to a single curriculum.
  60. Acceleration in this way means it’s easy to look at dual enrollment options for high school, along with early college entrance opportunities.
  61. Field trips can be a big part of an eclectic homeschool.
  62. Eclectic homeschoolers drive their own schedule — perfect for non-morning people like us
  63. It’s easy to adopt the daily schedule that works best for your family when you’re eclectic.
  64. Got an eager preschooler or a gifted toddler? Incorporate learning into their day in a way that fits your family — without worrying about what others think.
  65. Play-based learning is perfect for young children — gifted or otherwise — and is easy to incorporate when you’re an eclectic homeschooler.
  66. Kids learn to read when they’re developmentally ready — you can be flexible and relaxed in your approach. 
  67. The eclectic method may be best for you if you feel learning happens organically when you’re relaxed.
  68. Eclectic homeschoolers know that learning can’t be forced, and they’re partners with their children in their own education.
  69. Learning happens oragnically all the time, and eclectic homeschoolers are able to embrace teachable moments.
  70. Eclectic homeschooling can bring peace to your home.
  71. The flexibility of eclectic homeschooling means that there’s more time for discovering outside passions.
  72. Celebrating creativity is an integral part of the eclectic homeschool.
  73. If your kiddo is a passionate artist, you can give them time, resources, and classes to explore their talents.
  74. For musical kiddos (like mine), it’s easy to take advantage of the off times at music studios to arrange private lessons.
  75. Morning Time (check out the NEW book by my friend Pam Barnhill) works perfectly with an eclectic approach.
  76. Flexibility and an eclectic approach builds your kiddos’ confidence as they learn to take charge of their own educations.
  77. Eclectic homeschooling allows you to use textbooks as a spine and jumping off point. 
  78. Incorporate documentaries into different subject areas to excite and engage your visual learners. 
  79. Embracing an eclectic, child-led style of homeschooling builds a family culture around learning, oftentimes eliminating sibling competition.
  80. Gifted kiddos tend to march to the beat of their own drum, so embracing an eclectic approach makes it easier for their quirks to shine.
  81. With an eclectic approach to learning, parents can adapt to things that cause their gifted/2e kiddos anxiety — like perfectionism — and structure the way they assess differently.
  82. With an eclectic approach, gifted kiddos can tackle several years worth of materials in a single year if they want to.
  83. Embracing a child-led, eclectic approach shows kids that learning is all around them.
  84. Eclectic learners can be self-guided… I give my older kids the teacher materials and let them run with them.
  85. Exploring a variety of topics lets kids find the things they love — and then run with them.
  86. Got unschool-y leanings, but aren’t completely comfortable letting it all go? Eclectic homeschooling is a great bridge to help you relax more and more.
  87. Being eclectic means you’re embracing the fact that homeschooling is a lifestyle of learning, and not necessarily a methodology.
  88. Gifted kiddos thrive on novelty, and the eclectic approach is a great way to incorporate new things into learning. 
  89. Eclectic homeschooling is a mosaicwhere you take the best resources, information, and opportunities and break them up into small pieces, creating something entirely unique to you.
  90. Being eclectic means that there’s no one path and that you can try new things throughout your homeschooling career.
  91. Being eclectic allows us to take advantage of some pretty cool resources like Around the World Stories.
  92. We love using kits from Groovy Lab in a Box when we need a break from the regular lessons.
  93. The kids have had the opportunity to dive into Minecraft coding with programs from Connected Camps.
  94.  Little Passports helped the kids get an introduction to geography when they were young.
  95. My ten-year-old and I are learning to knit and crochet through inexpensive online classes at Craftsy.
  96. It’s super fun to find ways to surprise the kids in an eclectic homeschool, and one of our newest loves is the subscription from Brick Loot.
  97. There is no such thing as a perfect curriculum — for you OR your kiddos — so letting go of the search for the one thing that does it all frees you up to pick the best part of each different curriculum you come across.
  98. Because we follow the kids’ interests, we can snag several workbooks around a theme when Dover Publications (a fave from way back in my teaching days) has a good deal.
  99. Eclectic homeschooling is great prep for thinking outside of the box and using unorthodox methods to help kids learn — kind of like our Alexaschooling.
  100. With an eclectic approach to homeschooling, parents can totally tailor things to be exactly what each child needs to be most successful in life.
  101. Eclectic, relaxed, child-led homeschooling creates the perfect environment for a gifted kid — and family — to thrive in peace.

Are you convinced that it’s okay to slow down, relax, and let your child (and your heart) lead your homeschool? What other reasons or benefits do you find in an eclectic approach to homeschooling? Share in the comments or tag me on social media.

Colleen Kessler

Colleen is an explorer, tinkerer, educator, writer, creator, and a passionate advocate for the needs of gifted and twice-exceptional children. She has a B.S. in elementary education, a M.Ed. in gifted studies, is a sought-after national speaker and educational consultant, and is the founder of the popular blog and podcast Raising Lifelong Learners, as well as Raising Poppies, a community of support for parents of gifted children. She lives in northeast Ohio with her four bright and quirky kiddos, patient husband, and ever-changing collection of small reptiles, mammals, and insects.

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